Part 21 Report - 1996-783

ACCESSION #: 9701090073 NOTE: This text document was processed from a scanned version or an electronic submittal and has been processed as received. Some tables, figures, strikeouts, redlines, and enclosures may not have been included with this submittal, or have been omitted due to ASCII text conversion limitations. In order to view this document in its entirety, you may wish to use the NUDOCS microfiche in addition to the electronic text. Struthers-Dunn Model 255XCXP Relay Root Cause Evaluation Principal for Salem Nuclear Generation Station October 30, 1996 FPI 96-829 Struthers-Dunn Model 255XCXP Relay Root Cause Evaluation Principal for Salem Nuclear Generation Station October 30, 1996 FPI 96-829 Principal Investigators: James Riddle Mike Ramsey Technical Contact: Craig Bersak, PSE&G Approved By: Dr. Chong Chiu This report was prepared for Public Service Electric and Gas Company. No part of this document may be reproduced without the consent of FPI, International. Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Failure Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Visual Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Electrical testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Force-Balance Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Analysis Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Root Cause Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Corrective Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Attachments: I Photodocumentation II Correspondence - Application Information III Product Data Executive Summary FPI, International received four (4) relays for failure analysis and Root Cause Evaluation from Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Salem Nuclear Generating Station. One of the relays was reported to have spuriously unlatched and a second relay was reported to not have latched on actuation. The other two relays, one a new style and the other an old style relay, were supplied as correlation samples. Failure analysis confirmed the failure to latch of the one relay and the spurious unlatching, under mild mechanical shock, of the second relay. A significant finding was construction differences between the old style (1972 vintage) and new style relays (1995 vintage). The construction differences make the new type relays more prone to latching problems than the older style relay. The most significant difference is the lower latching force on the new style relays. This problem is the direct result of lower spring tension on the latch lever. Another significant concern is the deviation of the electrical characteristics of the new release coils from the design specifications which indicate that the new relays are not direct replacements for the old relays. The root cause of the two relay failures is design differences between the old and new relays that make the new relays more prone to latching problems and spurious unlatching than the old style relays. The three corrective action recommendations are to (1) review safety related applications for susceptibility to failure of the new style relays and replace or rework relays which present significant compromise of plant safety, (2) review new relay design to justify like for like compatibility with the old style relays and (3) conduct tests and measurements to determine adjustments to be made on new relays to assure operability in challenging environments. FPI, International has the expertise to assist in implementing all the corrective actions. 1 Introduction FPI, International received four (4) relays for failure analysis and Root Cause Evaluation from Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Salem Nuclear Generating Station. One of the relays was reported to have spuriously unlatched and a second relay was reported to not have latched on actuation. The other two relays were correlation samples. The component identification and system designation was supplied to FPI in a memo dated September 20, 1996 which is included in Attachment II at the end of this report. Additional background information was obtained via FAX on October 3, 1996, also included in Attachment II. The failed relays are new components which had been recently installed in Bailey Meter Company Relay modules, part number 6615692A, as part of a general relay change out due. to the aging of the original relays which have been operating for the life of the plant. There have 5 reported failures of the new type relays. The relays are procured as Safety Related components after being dedicated by a third party vendor. The manufacturer, Magnacraft Struthers-Dunn does not supply the relay as Appendix B, Safety Related items. The Bailey Product Instructions and relay manufacturer data sheet are in attachment III at the end of this report. 2 Failure Analysis Visual Inspection The relays are Magnacraft Struthers-Dunn (S-D or MSD) model 255XCXP type latching relays. The operate coils are 24-28 VDC. The release coils are also 24-28 VDC. Relay #1 is an old relay, date code 7228. It was supplied as a correlation sample. The part markings are 255XCX111, manufactured by S- D. The plastic case was slightly darkened with age. The switch contacts were clean and the exterior of the coils showed no evidence of degradation which is usually seen as darkening or cracking of the insulation. The mechanical design of this relay is significantly different that the three new relays. Relay #2 is a new relay, date code 9549. It was reported to have spuriously unlatched in service. It was later reported that the unlatching of this relay was concurrent with the actuation an adjacent relay in the same Bailey module. The part markings are 255XCX128. The suffixes in the part numbers is either for a Bailey (111) part or a Public Service (128) part. Internal inspection revealed that this relay was essentially new. There was no evidence of aging on any of the internal components. There was no evidence of any loose parts or gross misalignment the coils or latching mechanism. No wear was evident on the latching mechanism or any other moving parts. Relay #3 is a new relay, date code 9616. It was reported to have failed to latch upon actuation while in service in a Bailey Relay module. The part markings are 255XCX128. Internal inspection revealed that this relay was new. There was no evidence of aging on any of the internal components. There was no evidence of loose parts or gross misalignment of the coils or latching mechanism. No wear was evident on the latching mechanism or a... other moving parts. 3 Relay #4 is a new stock relay, date code 96** (date code marking on case smudged). It was supplied as a correlation sample. The part markings are 255XCX128. Internal inspection revealed that this relay was new. There was no evidence of aging on any of the internal components. There was no evidence of any loose parts or gross misalignment of the coils or latching mechanism. No wear was evident on the latching mechanism or any other moving parts. As was mentioned earlier, there are significant differences in the mechanical construction of the old relay and the three new relays. Most of the differences are in the reset coil and latch assembly. 1. The presence of a frame in the new relays is a major difference compared to the old relay. On the old relay the reset coil assembly is attached directly to the top of the operate coil assembly. On the new relays the operate and reset assemblies are attached to a U shaped frame. The frame provides less torsional rigidity to the assembly, especially in the alignment of the resent and operate coils. 2. There are numerous alignment adjustments on the both the new and old assembles, all intended to precisely position the plastic latch on the reset coil armature to the latch lever on the operate coil armature. On the old style relay these adjustments are made with the hardware on rigid clamps which connect the reset coil assembly to the operated coil assembly. On the new style relay these adjustments are in the frame attachment hardware and in the case of the height adjustment via shims between the reset coil assembly and the frame. The alignment scheme on the new style relays is less rigid then that on the old style relays. 3. The switch contact spring arms are significantly more bent, preloaded, on the new relays. This results in a higher contact force on the new relays but also a higher pull-in force of the operate coil and stronger pull-out force on the reset coil latch. 4 4. The reset coils are completely different on the old and new style relays. The coil resistance of the new reset coils is in the range of 460 Ohms and the old reset coils measures 309 Ohms (cold). The core is also larger on the old style reset coil. The higher resistance on the new coils is disturbing because it is not in accordance with the data sheet specification. The electrical performance differences will be discussed below in the Electrical Testing section of the report. 5. A most significant difference between the old and new style relays, as related to the failure mode, is the reset coil armature spring. The armature return spring on the old relay is significantly stretched in the latched and released states. This delivers significant force to the latch. The return spring on the new relays is almost fully relaxed in the released position and slightly stretched in the latched position. This condition provides reduced holding force to the latch. The details of this condition will be discussed on the Force Balance section of this report. Electrical testing Initial electrical testing confirmed the failure to latch of the #3 relay. The #3 relay would not remain latched when the operate coil was actuated and power was removed. After the cover was removed the relay began to latch successfully. It was noted during removal of the cover that it was a tight fit and reinstallation of the cover confirmed that the tight fit was interfering with the relay frame, causing it to bend. Testing after the cover was reinstalled revealed that the relay would not latch. The presence of the cover is interfering with the alignment of the latch mechanism. It was noted during subsequent testing, after the cover was removed that the relay could be made to release with a minor flexing (twisting) of the frame. 5 Initial electrical testing of relay #2 revealed that the relay would latch at normal voltage/current compared to #4 but could be made to unlatch under mild mechanical shock (pencil tap on side of case). Initial electrical testing of #1 and #4 revealed that they both set and rest normally. Relay #4 could be made to release with moderate mechanical shock (screw driver handle tap to side of case) and #1 could be made to release under strong mechanical shock (banging relay on table top). Static electrical testing was performed with a DMM in the resistance mode (Fluke 8060A) for coil resistance measurements and a millivolt meter and a constant current source (10.00 mA) for the switch contact resistance measurements. The switch contact resistances in the N/O and N/C states on all the relays were good, in the range of 0.001 Ohms. The coil resistance measurements on the relays revealed that there was a significant difference on the reset coils on the old and new style relays: Sample Operate coil Reset coil #1 240 Ohms 309 Ohms #2 250 Ohms 460 Ohms #3 240 Ohms 470 Ohms #4 250 Ohms 460 Ohms The Struthers-Dunn specification sheet shows a nominal resistance for the operate coil of 250 Ohms and a nominal resistance for the reset coil of 300 Ohms. The higher resistance (more windings) of the new coils results in a lower current (cold) necessary to actuate the reset coil as indicated by the following data: Sample Volts Release mA #1 24 VDC 78.2 mA #2 24 VDC 52.0 mA #3 24 VDC 51.0 mA #4 24 VDC 52.5 mA 6 Again, The Struthers-Dunn data sheet specifies a nominal release current of 80 milli-Amps for these relays. The new relays are not in compliance with the published specifications. Another result of the different release coil assembly is a lower reset voltage on the new relays due to the lower overcoming force necessary on the reset armature spring. The pick-up and drop-out voltages are recorded as follows: #1 Pick-up = 16.8 VDC Release = 15.5 VDC Pick-up = 15.3 VDC #2 Pick-up = 12.9 VDC Release = 11.9 VDC Pick-up = 13.3 VDC #3 Pick-up = 14.0 VDC Release = 10.0 VDC Pick-up = 13.5 VDC #4 Pick-up = 15.9 VDC Release = 12.2 VDC Pick-up = 12.9 VDC Note that the release voltage is somewhat lower on the new relays which is a result of the lower return spring overcoming force as discussed in the Force Balance section of the report. 7 Force Balance Analysis A force-balance analysis was performed on the latching mechanism of the old relay compared to the new relays. Samples #1, #2 and #4 were used for the testing. Sample #3 was left intact for possible future testing as a worst case condition. Diagram omitted. The above diagrams are the force balance schematics. The left schematic is in the latched position and the right schematic is in the unlatched position. Relays #1 (Old Style) and #2 (New Style) were used to take direct measurements of the spring and latch geometries. The spring on the #1 relay was noted to be extended in both the latched and unlatched positions. The spring on the #2 relay appeared to n--be extended in the latched position. The spring dimensions were taken from established reference points across the collapsed and extended spring coils. The spring extension was measured on the release armature springs, in place, in the latched and unlatched state. The springs were then removed from the relays and the K factor was measured. The armatures were measured to obtained the lever ratio from the spring center of force to the lip of the latch. The following data was obtained: 8 PARAMETER OLD #1 NEW # 2 Spring Constant 66 gram/mm 78.6 gram/mm Extended Length Latched 10.4 mm 6.3 mm Extended Length Unlatched 10.65 mm 6.7 mm Collapsed Length (Removed) 8.5 mm 6.25 mm Spring Force Latched 125.4 gram 3.93 gram Spring Force Unlatched 142.0 gram 35.0 gram Lever Ratio 2.64 : 1 3.2 : 1 Latched Clamping Force 47.5 gram 1.23 gram The latching force is significantly lower at the latch on the new relays than on the old relays. Combined with the higher switch contact spring tension on the new relays, which work to pull the relay open, the new relays are more susceptible, by design, to a failure to latch (based on minor misalignments) and spurious unlatching under minor mechanical shock. A calculation was made to determine what adjustments would be necessary to increase the latching force on the new relays to that on the old relay. It was determined that bending the spring attachment tab approximately 1.88 mm open was sufficient to increase to latching force at the latch on the new relays to the 50 gram range measured on the old relays. This may be the most efficient fix for the weak latching problem. However, simply bending the tabs on the reset relay armature may affect relay timing and release coil pick-up voltage. A simple experiment was performed on #2 to test the effect of bending the armature tab to open the spring. Note that this relay had been disassembled and the spring manipulated (loop opened) prior to the experiment. The relay was reassembled to approximate the original condition. The spring extension measured 6.5 mm in the latched condition. The release voltage (worst case, cold) measured 11.62 volts at 24 mA. The tab on the release coil frame was bent open 1.9 mm. It was noticed that the opening of the tab caused the spring coils to open slightly but most of the stretch was taken up by opening of the coil attachment loop. The spring extension measured 6.9 mm in the latched position at the same 9 datum as the original measurement. The extension resulted in a calculated increase of the latching force from 2.45 gm to 12.3 gm at the latch. The pickup voltage measured 11.69 VDC at 24.8 mA after the bend. The conclusions from this experiment are that bending the tab out to extend the spring does not significantly affect the pickup voltage characteristics of the relay. one observation made during this experiment is that, as a rule of thumb, one must be able to see light between the spring coils in order to assure some spring extension in the latched condition. Light could not be detected in the original 6.5 mm extension but could be seen in the 6.9 mm extension. This parameter could be quantified as a spacing measurement between coil loops. The result of the bend is a 5X increase in latching force between the two adjustments with no significant change in the electrical performance. Evaluate these results with caution, the effect on switching time has not been determined. Analysis Conclusions Testing and failure analysis first confirmed the failure to latch on #3. This relay recovered the ability to latch when the cover was removed and failed when the cover was replaced. The latch could be made to release under mild twisting stress to the frame during testing with the cover removed. Relay #2 was made to unlatch under much lower mechanical shock stress than the old design #1 relay. The old style and new style relays have significant design differences especially in the latching mechanism. These differences contribute to the propensity for the failure to latch mechanism and the spurious release failure mechanism. The major differences are listed as follows: A. The presence of the surrounding frame in the new relays is a much less torsionally rigid system for maintaining the latching mechanism critical dimensionality than the old style direct bracket arrangement between the operate and reset coil assemblies. 10 B. The lack of rigidity in the frame means that the latching adjustment tolerances must be maintained to a very precise degree to insure proper operation. The new style relays are prone to spuriously release under much lower mechanical shock than the old style relays. Stress from pressure from the cover caused relay #3 to fail due to distortion of the frame. C. The lower latching force on the new relays is the primary cause of the lowered ability of the new relays to latch and remain latched. The most direct corrective action is to increase the spring force on the new relay reset latch armature. D. The electrical characteristics of the new release coils are significantly different than the old coil and are not in compliance with the manufacturers published data. As a result of this difference (and the reset mechanism differences), the new relays are not "like for like" replacements for the old relays. Root Cause Evaluation The root cause of the two relay failures is design differences between the old and new relays that make the new relays more prone to latching problems and spurious unlatching than the old style relays. Another significant concern is the deviation of the electrical characteristics of the new release coils from the design specifications which indicate that the new relays are not direct replacements for the old relays. 11 Corrective Actions Three corrective actions are recommended. FPI, International has the expertise to assist in implementing all the corrective actions. First, a review should be performed of all the plant applications of the new relays for their adequacy in the operating and design environment. Determine if the reliability of the new style relay is adequate for the Safety Related applications at the Salem Nuclear Generating Station. This corrective action is necessary to justify the installation of the new relays in safety critical applications. If adequate justification cannot be made, the relays will have to be changed out. Secondly, review the adequacy of the new relay design. This corrective action involves a review of the results of this analysis with the manufacturer and supplier in order to determine the reasons for the design changes and the manufactures basis for assuming that the relays are interchangeable. This is especially critical in the lowering of the holding force on the reset coil latch and incidentally important on the release coil electrical parameter changes (which if justified would require a specification sheet change). We suspect that the coil changes are the result of maintaining switching time specifications but we do not have access to that design information. Thirdly, conduct necessary tests, adjustments and experiments to justify the use of the new relays in challenging environments. One experiment performed at FPI on the new relays determined that simply adjusting the spring tension on the release armature spring as little as 1 mm will increase the latching force to the range of the old style relays. This adjustment could potentially correct the problem. Similar mechanical adjustments or repairs may increase the reliability of the relays to acceptable levels. It is possible that augmented testing, dimensional verification or design change justification may be adequate to assure the reliability of the replacement relays. 12 It is a also incumbent on PSE&G to inform other users of this model relay of the problems encountered with the spurious unlatching. A short report on the INPO Nuclear Network of the problems encountered at Salem would be a responsible action. There may be Part 21 issues associated with the dedication of the relays for Safety Related applications. This issue should be evaluated by the supplier. 13 Attachment I Photodocumentation Figure 1: "Photograph of the old style relay #1, case removed. Note the bracket attachment of the reset coil assembly." omitted. Figure 2: "photograph of relay #1, side view, showing the frame arrangement for the coil assemblies." omitted. Figure 3: "Close up of the reset assembly on relay #1, unlatched." omitted. Figure 4: "Close up of the reset assembly on relay #1, latched." omitted. Figure 5: "Close up of relay #1 reset coil spring assembly." omitted. Figure 6: "Magnified view of Figure 5 showing the spring extension on the #1 relay, latched position." omitted. Figure 7: "Photograph of relay #2, case removed. The relay is in the latched position." omitted. Figure 8: "Close up of Figure 7 showing the reset coil assembly in the latched position. Note the coil extension." omitted. Figure 9: "Photograph of relay #3 with the cover removed, unlatched position." omitted. Figure 10: "Close up of the reset coil assembly in Figure 9." omitted. Figure 11: "Photograph of relay #4, cover removed, in the unlatched position." omitted. Figure 12: "Close up of the reset coil assembly on relay #4, latched position. Note the spring extension." omitted. Attachment II Correspondence Application information MEMO To: Dr. Chong Chiu From: Craig D. Bersak (609) 339-7463, FAX (609)339-2210 PSE&G Nuclear Business Unit, PO Box 236, Hancocks Bridge, NJ 08038 Subject: Proposal for Relay Failure Analysis Date: September 20, 1996 The following is being provided in anticipation of approval of a Purchase Order by PSE&G, it is not authorization to begin work. Enclosed are four relays for your evaluation. Relay #1 was is an old relay that has NOT had a failure associated with it. Relay #2 spuriously tripped from a latched condition to its reset condition. Relay #3 failed to maintain itself latched following an operate demand. Relay #4 is a new relay that has not been installed in a Salem system. The case was opened and the wire from pin 5 to the RESET coil repositioned due to its having been crimped. Relay #2 (83 relay for 22RH29) functions as the AUTO-MANUAL relay for the RHR Heat Exchanger Bypass valve. Its failure occurred when it swapped to MANUAL (reset condition) as RHR loop flow was being reduced to its low flow setpoint. The low flow signal energizes a 219 style 115 Vac relay co-located with this relay in its Bailey Can. [The 83 relay is in the K1 position in the can, two 219 style relays are in the K2 and K3 position actuated on High and Low flow signals respectively.] Relay #3 (18SS relay for 22 BAT Pp) is the Slow Speed Start relay for a Boric Acid Transfer Pump. It failed to maintain the latched condition when the demand condition was removed. [The 83 relay is in the K1 position in the can, two 219 style 115 Vac relays are in the K2 and K3 position, actuated on High and Low flow signals respectively.] Additionally, I am including the following documentation: Circuit diagrams for relays #2 and 3. Manufacturer's Specifications for 255 and 219 style relays Bailey Relay Module Technical Manual If I can be of any assistance please call me at (609) 339-7463. MEMO To: Mr. James Riddle FAX (714)361-5479 From: Craig D. Bersak (609) 339-7463, FAX (609)339-2210 PSE&G Nuclear Business Unit, PO Box 236, Hancocks. Bridge, NJ 08038 Subject: Response to Questions from 10/2/96 Date: October 3, 1996 Here are answers to your questions from yesterday. Are the capacitors electrolytic? Electrolytic capacitors are used in some Bailey control circuits. I looked over the Boric Acid Transfer Pump and 22RH29 control circuits and neither of these circuits use capacitors. You may be confusing the contacts off of the control room's pushbutton stations for capacitors. A pushbutton's contact appears as: (Equation omitted.) The capacitors shown in the Bailey manual, page 3, as pan of the Suppression Circuit Board, are not in the models of the modules used at Salem (6615692A1, A2, A3). Where electrolytic capacitors are used they are being inspected /tested and replaced when necessary. What is the voltage at the relay cabinets? The 28 VDC system voltage is nominally maintained between 28 to 30.3 VDC. Per a verbal discussion with a technician, they typically see 29+ VDC when they check at the back of a relay cabinet. What is the significance of the suffixes -111, -128 on the relay IDs? I have not been able to identify the specific special construction features identified by these suffixes. The S-D catalog states "when a special type of construction is not covered by a 'common' feature or when it combines several of them, a "special number is assigned at the factory. This number will always be '100' or greater, and applies only to the relay to which it was assigned." I've tried repeatedly to contact Mr. Thomas Mahaffey, Production Engineering Manager at Magnecraft/Struthers-Dunn (803) 395-8512, for the details without his returning my calls. When I get in contact with him I will inform you of the results. Should you need any other information please contact me. FAX To: W. James Riddle FAX# 714-361-5479 From: Craig D. Bersak (609) 339-7463, FAX (609)339-2210 PSE&G Nuclear Business Unit, PO Box 236, Hancocks Bridge, NJ 08038 Subject: Relay suffix numbers Date: October 3, 1996 Spoke to Tom Mahaffey of MSD, the suffix numbers mean that the relays were marked with a Bailey Part number (Suffix 111) or Public Service part number (Suffix 129). Otherwise they are the standard 255XCXP relays, Attachment III Product Data SECTION Bailey E92-52 PRODUCT INSTRUCTIONS RELAY MODULE PT. NO. 6615692A [ ] Figure omitted. BAILEY METER COMPANY o WICKLIFFE, OHIO 44092 FORM 1E92-52-670 LITHO IN U.S.A. E92-52 Page 2 Bailey MODULE DESCRIPTION The Relay Module for Bailey 660 Systems is a three-unit wide (3-3/8 inches) module designed for plug-in mounting in a standard Bailey electronic systems cabinet (see Figure 1). The unit is frequently used with the Type RZ Multiple Switch and Light Station for contact interlock and signal light operation. Figure 1 - "Relay Module" omitted. The module can contain three plug-in, multiple-contact relays and is used primarily for interlocking or circuit protection. As options, diodes can be added for selective relay operation or a warning flasher can be installed. Three general purpose relays can be installed in one module. If a flasher is used, height interference permits a maximum of two latch type relays and one general purpose relay to be installed in one module. Relay variations are listed in Table 1. The complete assembly of the module is shown in Figure 4. All electrical connections are made thru one or two rectangular 32- pin connectors mounted on the rear of the module. Table 1 omitted. [copyright] BAILEY METER COMPANY 1970 E92-52 Relay Module Page 3 CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION Suppression Circuit Board Six sets of resistors (R1 thru R6) and capacitors (C1 thru C6 can be provided on an optional suppression circuit board (PC1). The circuit provides protection to the coil initiating contacts to prevent burning or erosion due to coil inductance. Incoming transients are also suppressed with the addition of this circuit. See Figure 2. Figure 2 - "Schematic Wiring Diagram" omitted. Three sets of resistors and capacitors are permanently connected to relay operating coils. Remaining sets must be connected to the release coils when using a latch type relay and must be connected at installation. Blocking Diode Circuit Blocking diodes (CR1 thru CR6) are optional and are located on rectangular connector pins at rear of module. Diodes provide selective relay operation on bidirectional operating voltages. See wiring schematic shown in Figure 2. Flasher One optional flasher can be provided in the module. Circuit wiring for flasher must be provided external to module. Input voltage of flasher is 18 to 32v DC with a power consumption of 1 watt. Contact rating is 0.5a (resistive load) with a flashing rate of 1/2 second on, 1/2 second off. Flash rate is not adjustable. Control Relay Internal wiring diagrams for various types of relays are shown in Figure 3. Figure 2 "Schematic Wiring Diagram" omitted. E92-52 Page 4 Bailey FIGURE 3 - "Relay Internal Wiring Diagrams" omitted. SERVICING Check operation of Relay Module by substituting a known trouble-free module for the one in service. If trouble is definitely traced to the module, check for broken wires, damaged connectors or shorted leads. If trouble continues after repair, consult a Bailey service representative or return unit to factory for repair. Flasher Replacement (Refer to Figure 4.) 1. Remove fastener studs and pull Relay Module from systems cabinet. 2. If module has plug-in relay installed in KX3 position, remove relay. 3. Disconnect wires to flasher (12). 4. Disassemble flasher by removing hex nuts (20) and washers (21). 5. Install new flasher and rewire in accordance with Figure 5. 6. Replace relay in KX3 position if removed in step 2. 7. Install Relay Module in systems cabinet. Replace fastener studs and tighten. REPLACEMENT PARTS A Parts Drawing covering the Relay Module is shown in Figure 4. This drawing will normally apply to the units furnished. However, there may be individual differences in specific assemblies due to: a. Design changes made since the printing of this Instruction Section. b. Special design of equipment furnished to mae it suitable for special application. Therefore, when ordering parts, assure receipt of correct replacements by specifying on the order: 1. Complete nomenclature, code label number and part number of equipment for which parts are desired. 2. Parts Drawing number on which each part is illustrated. (The Parts Drawing Number is given in the title for the Figure.) E92-52 Relay Module Page 5 FIGURE 4 - "Parts Drawing E92-58, Relay Module, Part No. 6615692A" omitted. E92-52 Page 6 Bailey FIGURE 5 "Relay Module Wiring Diagram" omitted. Instructions for Understanding Bailey Relay Cabinet Arrangement and Wire Tabulations The Bailey Relay Cabinets an sectioned in 11 rows, which contain the following equipment and designations: Row 1 1634-pin Amphenol Series 93 Cable Connectors. Cables that route to the Control Console plug in here. The cable connector position number is identified by numbers 2 thru 16. The pins on each connector art identified by letter designation A thru NN. Rows 2 thru 9 Bailey Relay Modules. The relay modules consist of three relay sockets, identified as KX1, KX2, and KX3 (front to rear of module), a flasher relay in some but not all modules), and two male 32-pin Amphenol Blue Ribbon style connectors (mounted to the rear of the module). Female 32-pin connectors am mounted on the back of the relay cabinet, while the rear doors of the cabinet provide access to this wiring. The pins of the connectors am identified by numbers 1 to 32, and there are 15 of these connectors mounted per row on the cabinet's back panel. Row 10 16 34-pin Amphenol Series 93 Cable Connectors. Cables that route to the Aux. Control System Terminal cabinets (located in the Relay Room, directly below the, Control Room) plug in here. The cable connector position number is identified by numbers 1 thru 16. The pins on each connector are identified by letter designation A thru NN. Row 11 Service Section of the Cabinet. A 40-point terming strip (which is identified as Position 1) and 10 circuit breakers (identified as Positions 2 thru 11). Table omitted. Figures 1 and 2 "Typical Bailey Relay Cabinet Arrangement" omitted. Examine the designation in Fig. 1. The cabinet series and cabinet number is shown in the title block of the arrangement drawing, and identifies the particular cabinet where the components are located (in this case, RC25-6). The bottom three characters, as shown, call out the row, wiring position, and pin number. The row designation should be self explanatory (they are clearly represented on the arrangement drawings). There are three wiring positions in each module, where relay sockets X-1 and X-2 (designated as KX1 and KX2 in PSBP #301699) are in the first wiring position. Relay socket X-3 (KX3 on the PSBP) and the flasher are in the second wiring position. The third wiring position (which is used for jumpering on the rear panel of the Bailey Relay cabinet) never has any equipment located in it. The rear or the Relay Module has two male Blue Ribbon Connectors mounted on the rear section, while the rear of the Bailey Relay Cabinet has three female Blue Ribbon Connectors mounted. There are three wiring positions in each module, and are numbered from the top to bottom, left to right. Since there are 5 module slots per row, that yields 15 wiring positions. Note that there is never any equipment shown in any wiring position divisible by three (3, 6, 9, 12, & 15). For example, the location of the 74/OP relay for the Rod Control Reactor Bypass Breaker "A" is 6-6-13, or cabinet 6, row 6, and wiring position 13. The wiring in the cabinet is color-coded in the following manner: 118 VAC Line,- Black 118 VAC Neutral- White 118 VAC Ground - Green 28 VDC Positive - Brown 28 VDC Negative - Orange 125 VDC Positive - Blue 125 VDC Negative - Yellow Computer Inputs and - Green Alarms Indication - Red NOTES: 1. Only 2 wires per Blue Ribbon Connector pin may be terminated (Rows 2 thru 9), and the maximum wire size is #18 AWG. 2. Only 1 wire per Amphenol Series 93 Connector pin (Rows 1 and 10), and the maximum wire size allowable is #22 AWG. 3. All soldering is to be performed by qualified personnel in accordance with the latest soldering procedure. Figure "MODULE PART NUMBERs" omitted. Figure "BAILEY RELAY CABINET (Rear View) omitted. Figures "idec GT3A SERIES; GT3A-1/GT3A-2/GT3A-3 (Multi-Mode), Four Selectable Operation Modes In One Timer (On Delay, Interval, Cycle and Cycle On" omitted. Figure "GT3A-1, -2, and -3 ALL MULTI-RIVERS (MULTI-MODE TYPE)" omitted. Figure "Timing Diagrams" omitted. Figures and Tables "300 VOLT GENERAL PURPOSE PLUG-IN RELAYS" omitted. Series 219 General Purpose Industrial Plug-In Relays feature a 12 pin and a 14 pin size, from 2 Form C to 4 Form C or 6 Form A/Form B combinations. A locking clip on the plug is provided as standard. The coil is encapsulated for protection. Gold diffused silver cadmium oxide contacts are standard. The screw terminal socket has all terminals on a single level, which facilitates the wiring process. Nuclear qualified versions are available. Contact the factory for details. PUBLIC SERVICE ELECTRIC AND GAS COMPANY NUCLEAR DEPARTMENT SPECIFICATION NO. S-C-RCP-CDS-0343 REACTOR CONTROL AND PROTECTION SYSTEM CONTROL RELAYS DETAILED SPECIFICATION REFERENCE NO: N/A IMPORTANT TO SAFETY: YES NO Routing form omitted. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 SCOPE 1 2.0 DEFINITIONS 1 3.0 CODES, STANDARDS AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 3 4.0 SUPPLEMENTAL DATA 4 5.0 DOCUMENT SUBMITTALS 4 6.0 DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 6 7.0 PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS 6 8.0 MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS 6 9.0 FABRICATION AND ASSEMBLY REQUIREMENTS 7 10.0 INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS 7 11.0 INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 7 12.0 QUALIFICATION 7 13.0 CLEANING 9 14.0 MARKING AND IDENTIFICATION 9 15.0 PACKAGING, HANDLING AND STORAGE 10 16.0 DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCES 10 17.0 RECORDS 10 18.0 OTHER REQUIREMENTS 10 19.0 RIGHT OF ACCESS 10 20.0 GA PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 11 21.0 RELAY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 12 21.1 219 Series 300 V General Purpose Plug-In Relay Specification Requirements 13 21.2 B255 Series 300 V Latching Plug-in Relay Requirements 16 21.3 219 & B255 Series Mating Socket Physical Dimensions 19 Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page ii LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES Page Number Revision i 0 ii 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 10 0 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 16 0 17 0 18 0 19 0 Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 1 1.0 SCOPE This specification defines the construction, functional, performance, quality assurance and shipping requirements for Struthers-Dunn 219 and B255 Series general purpose and latching plug-in relays respectively. These relays are used in various applications in the Reactor Control and Protection System and various other control systems at Salem Nuclear Generating Station Units 1 and 2. An equivalent replacement relay is acceptable. If it meets all the requirements of this specification and has the same form, fit and function as the Struthers-Dunn 219 and B255 Series relays. It is not the Intent herein to specify all details of design and construction. It shall be the responsibility of the Vendor to ensure that the equipment has been designed and fabricated in accordance with engineering codes, standards, and federal and state regulations in accordance with section 3.0 and 4.0 of this specification. No deviation from this specification or applicable federal, state, and local codes and standards shall be accepted until approved by PSE&G. Deviations are considered departures from any requirements of this specification. Nonconformances from federal, state, and local codes and standards must be submitted to the cognizant jurisdictional agency for authorization, prior to submittal to PSE&G. After obtaining approval, Vendor shall promptly document and notify PSE&G of all deviations and nonconformances from the purchase order/contract. Further engineering, manufacturing or fabrication after detection of any deviation or nonconformance prior to PSE&G approval shall be at the Vendor's risk. No departures from this specification shall be binding on any party until an addendum or revision to the specification has been issued. 2.0 DEFINITIONS 2.1 Abbreviations/Definitions ANSI - American National Standards Institute Approved - this word, when applied by the Owner to the Vendor's drawings or documents, means that the drawings or documents are satisfactory from the stand-point of interfacing with all Owner-furnished components of the installation and/or that the Owner has not observed any statement or feature that appears to deviate from the Specification's requirements. Except for the interfacing Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 2 with all Owner furnished components, the Vendor shall retain the entire responsibility for complete conformance with all of the specification's requirements. Class 1E - the safety classification of the electrical equipment and systems that are essential to emergency reactor shutdown, containment and reactor host removal or are otherwise essential in preventing significant release of radioactive material to the environment. Design - the time during which satisfactory performance can be Life expected for a specific set of service conditions. NEMA - National Electrical Manufactures Association IEEE - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers OBE - Operational Basis Earthquake Owner - Public Service Electric and Gas, Newark, New Jersey PSE&G - Public Service Electric And Gas PSIA - pounds per square inch absolute Seismic - indicates that the equipment has been classified and Qualified certified to meet its performance requirements during and following one SSE preceded by five OBE's. All seismically qualified equipment shall satisfy Category 1 seismic requirements. Service - the Interval from installation to removal, during Life which the equipment may be subject to service conditions and service demands. SQURTS- Seismic Qualification Report & Testing Standardization SSE - Safe Shutdown Earthquake Vendor- a company either submitting a proposal or selected to fulfill the requirements of this specification. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 3 3.0 CODES, STANDARDS AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 3.1 General 3.1.1 Various codes and addenda, standards, or other documents that are mentioned by short form name elsewhere in this specification are fully identified below. To the extent that these documents apply, as stated herein, the version of the document listed below shall be used. A later version of some of the dated documents may become mandatory under regulations that have jurisdiction. If this occurs, the mandated version of the document shall be used. 3.1.2 If there is, or seems to be, a conflict between this specification and a reference document, the matter shall be referred to the Owner who will provide written clarification. 3.2 Various applicable documents follow: ANSI N45.2.2 - 1972 Packing, Shipping, Receiving, Storage, and Handling of Items for Nuclear Power Plants ANSI N45.2.11 - 1974 Quality Assurance Requirements for the Design of Nuclear Power Plants IEEE 344 - 1975/87 Recommended Practices for Seismic Qualification of Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations SQTS-01-GSQTP General Seismic Qualification Technical Rev 4 Procedure SQTS-01-CR-1-SFP General Purpose Control Relays Seismic and Rev. 5 Functional Procedure UL 508 - 17th edition Standards for Safety Industrial Control Equipment Regulatory Guide 1.38 Quality Assurance Requirements for October 1976 Packaging, Shipping, Receiving, storage, and Handling of Items for Water-Cooled Nuclear Plants (endorses ANSI N45.2.2 1972) Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 4 Regulatory Guide 1.64 Quality Assurance Requirements for the October 1973 Design of Nuclear Power Plants (endorses ANSI N45.2.11-1974) Regulatory Guide 1.100 Seismic Qualification of Electrical Equipment for Nuclear Power Plants (endorses IEEE 344-1975) Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 21 Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance Part 50 Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities Appendix A General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants Appendix B Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Plants and Fuel Reprocessing Plants 4.0 SUPPLEMENTAL DATA 4.1 The Public Service Electric and Gas Company's Salem Generating Stations have committed to meeting the requirements of the Regulatory Guides of Section 3.2. Compliance with the Regulatory Guides shall be accomplished by satisfying the requirements of the associated ANSI, IEEE or ISA standards. 4.2 PSE&G - Standard Specification 0-01, "Quality Requirements for Suppliers." 5.0 DOCUMENT SUBMITTALS 5.1 Equipment Qualification Reports 5.1.1 The Vendor shall supply the Owner, for review and approval, four (4) copies of the Qualification report demonstrating compliance with the testing requirements of Section 12.0. Upon approval by the Owner, this requirement may be waived. 5.1.2 The qualification report shall document the results of the relay type testing performed and any analyses associated with such testing. 5.1.3 Qualification reports shall Include recorded date on all qualification tested samples. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 5 5.1.4 The qualification report shall document, evaluate and disposition any malfunctions, anomalies or performance deviations which occurred during testing. 5.1.5 All test results shall be reviewed, approved and signed by qualified personnel. 5.1.8 The Vendor shall confirm in writing and shall submit a report, including calculations and/or test data, for approval by the Owner which supports his statement that the equipment furnished under the specification meets the requirements for the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, Operating Basis Earthquake, and any other effects listed herein. The Vendor shall, as part of his report, provide natural frequency data determined by either analysis or test. The analysis or lost shall confirm that the resulting deflections shall not cause damage to the equipment which may be detrimental to its capability to function as specified. The Vendor shall include a schedule of submittals, approvals, interface resolutions, and certificates to be submitted to, or received from, the Owner, as discussed herein. When seismic qualification is based on testing, a fully detailed test plan must be submitted to the Owner for approval prior to the initiation of testing, unless equipment has been pre-qualified. Any deviations from the approved test procedure must be approved by the Owner. Resolution of Engineering comments on module qualifications may require additional testing which will be negotiated. 5.1.7 All qualification reports shall be of high quality and legibility. 5.1.8 Manuals and reports shall be bound so that copies of each page may be easily made and revised pages may be easily added. 5.1.9 Each qualification report submittal shall have a unique control number for reference and control purposes. 5.1.10 Vendor provided qualification documentation should be identified with the PSE&G name and purchase order number. 5.1.11 A controlled copy of the qualification report shall be supplied with a purchased equipment whenever new qualification testing has been performed. 5.1.12 One controlled copy of each qualification report shall be retained at the Vendor's file for future reference. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 6 6.0 DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 6.1 The relay physical dimensions and coil & contact configuration shall be as shown by Attachments for the applicable relay type. 6.2 Relays shall plug into the socket assembly shown by Attachment for the applicable relay type. 6.3 Relays shall have a design life of not less then 40 years while in service under the mild environment defined in Section 6.4. The relay application (normally energized vs. normally de- energized) shall not affect the 40 year design life. The following exceptions shall apply; - maximum of 10 million mechanical operations - 100,000 at rated load - 500,000 at half rated load 6.4 Environmental Design Requirements 6.4.1 Relays shall be designed to operate in various instrument and relay racks with the following service condition environment Minimum Maximum Temperature (degrees F) 40 140 Pressure (PSIA) 14.69 15.20 Relative Humidity (%) 20 90 Radiation (Total Integrated Dose in RADS-gamma for 40 yrs.) <.10**4 7.0 PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS 7.1 The relays shall have performance characteristics which meet or exceed the specific performance requirements for each relay type in accordance with the Attachments to this specification. For specific performance requirements for each relay type see the applicable Attachment. 8.0 MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS 8.1 Relays shall be constructed of high quality materials. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 7 9.0 FABRICATION AND ASSEMBLY REQUIREMENTS 9.1 Relays shell be designed and constructed in accordance with the applicable Attachments. Equivalent replacement relays shall have the same physical dimensions, mounting, and coil and contact configuration as previously qualified relays to achieve the form, fit and function of the original relay. 9.2 Relay design, material and workmanship shall result in a high quality product. 10.0 INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS 10.1 Relays shall be designed for mounting In a socket in accordance with the applicable Attachment. Mounting may be in the vertical or horizontal plane in various equipment racks. 11.0 INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 11.1 The Owner's authorized representatives shall reserve the right to inspect design, materials and workmanship and to report thereon, at any time during the program of design, fabrication or testing. 12.0 QUALIFICATION 12.1 Electrical and Environmental Qualification Requirements 12.1.1 Relays shall be qualified for operation in the environment specified in Section 0.4. Relay parts shall not be subject to degradation for the specified life of the component. 12.1.2 Relays shall have UL 508 certification. The Vendor shall document the applicable parts of the UL 508 certification. 12.1.3 Design changes, part substitutions and other modifications to previously qualified designs require either additional qualification testing or analysis to prove now designs are qualified or to confirm changes have no impact on previous qualification testing respectively. The Vendor shall notify and inform the Owner of design changes or modifications to previously approved designs. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 8 12.2 Seismic Qualification Requirements 12.2.1 Seismic Qualification adequacy of the equipment shall be established by the results of seismic tests performed in accordance with IEEE Standard 344-1975/1987 as applicable and the combination of SQTS-01-GSQTP titled, "General Seismic Qualification Technical Procedure" and SQTS-01 CR-1-SFP titled, "General Purpose Control Relays Seismic and Functional Procedure." 12.2.2 The Vendor shall qualify the equipment for the specified seismic requirement either by performing a similarity analysis to a previously qualified equipment whose seismic qualification level is adequate to envelope the required seismic response spectra for the new equipment, or by performing the required simulated seismic qualification tests. Qualification testing or analysis should address relay mounting in the vertical or horizontal plane. 12.2.3 The equipment should be seismic tested to its fragility level or test response spectra (TRS) shall envelope the site specific required response spectra (RRS) when attached. 12.2.4 The minimum acceptance criteria or each seismically tested module shall include the following: - No loss of function or ability to perform designed functions before, during and after testing. - No structural or electrical failure which could compromise equipment integrity, - No adverse operation or misoperation before, during and after testing. Maximum allowable contact bounce (change of state) shall be 2 milliseconds during seismic testing. Test equipment shall be capable detecting contact bounce of 2 milliseconds or shorter duration. 12.3 Prototype Testing 12.3.1 Qualification programs may be based on prototype testing of equipment. A representative sample of each module type must be tested. Engineering justification of the program must be provided to assure qualification of all equipment supplied. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 9 Vendors may qualify equipment based on prior testing provided the test report is available to the Owner and the Vendor submits a report showing that this prior test meets seismic testing requirements herein. Changes to standard qualification documentation will be negotiated if review and approval requires modification. A final analysis and/or test report shall be compiled by the Vendor and submitted to the Owner for approval. It is required that the qualification document be complete and address fully the equipment being supplied in accordance with this specification. 12.4 Certification of Compliance 12.4.1 The seismic testing data report shall be stamped and signed by a Registered Professional Engineer. The Vendor shall submit a Certificate of Compliance (COC) documenting compliance to the design and qualification requirements of the specification. The certificate should reference the applicable purchase order, this specification and the applicable qualification report. The certificate shall be signed by the appropriate Quality Assurance representative. 12.4.2 The assemblies used for seismic testing or qualification shall not be used as a deliverable to the Owner. These test specimens are previously fatigued and are not suitable for operation. 12.4.3 The equipment shall perform its intended function when exposed to the service conditions environment specified in Section 6.4. A Certificate of Conformance shall be supplied. This should state that the equipment will perform its intended function within the applicable accuracies when subjected to the environmental conditions identified herein. 13.0 CLEANING 13.1 Before testing and prior to shipping, relays shall be thoroughly cleaned to remove dust, debris and other foreign materials. Cleaning agents used shall not damage finished surfaces or adversely affect material properties and function of equipment. 14.0 MARKING AND IDENTIFICATION 14.1 Each relay shall have a nameplate which identifies the model number, part number, serial number, coil voltage rating and manufacturing date. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 10 15.0 PACKAGING, HANDLING AND STORAGE 15.1 The packaging, handling, storage and preparation of relays for shipment shall be in accordance with ANSI N45.2.2 level B requirements. Relays shall be thoroughly protected against the elements and damage during transit and storage. 15.2 Equipment contents, part numbers and the Owner's purchase order number shall be clearly marked on shipped packages. 15.3 Vendor shall provide to the Owner instructions for applicable storing and handling instructions. 16.0 DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCES 16.1 The equipment covered by this Specification is safety related and is subject to the requirements of 10CFR Part 21 for the reporting of defects and noncompliances. 17.0 RECORDS 17.1 See Section 5.0 of this specification for all required documentation. 17.2 Qualification documentation and other correspondence related to the relays procured by this specification shall be retained by the Vendor for a minimum period of at least the equipment design life. These records should be forwarded to PSE&G for retention if they will not be retained by the Vendor. 17.3 All records shall be reproducible end capable of being microfilmed. 18.0 OTHER REQUIREMENTS 18.1 The terms and conditions of any warranty for the relays shall be clearly defined by the Vendor. 19.0 RIGHT OF ACCESS 19.1 The Owner shall have access to all vendor and sub-tier facilities and records which are directly related to the relays procured by this specification. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 11 19.2 The Owner shall notify the Vendor seven (7) calendar days in advance of such inspections. 20.0 QA PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 20.1 Suppliers of equipment to this specification are required to have a quality assurance programs which comply with the requirements of 10CFR50, "Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and Fuel Processing Plants," Appendix 5 and ANSI N45.2.11-1974 and demonstrate implementation through audit and/or inspection by the Owner. 20.2 The Vendor shall comply with PSE&G standard specification 0.01, Quality Assurance Requirements for Suppliers. 20.3 The Vendor's Quality Assurance Program shall be documented and shall, be approved by the Owner prior to the award of the contract. 20.4 Inspection and witnessing of in-process testing shall to be made available at the Owner's discretion and dependent upon proper notification by the Vendor prior to the performance of in-process testing. The Vendor shall notify the Owner's Quality Assurance Department by facsimile at (609) 339-7707 at least 72 hours prior to all vendor hold points. 20.5 Prior to shipment, the Owner has the option of performing a detailed inspection of the assembled relays. This inspection shall not lesson the responsibility of the Vendor for the completeness and correctness of the modules. 20.6 Parts or materials indicating irremediable or injurious defects, improper fabrication, excessive repairs, and/or not in accordance with this specification, the QA program, or approved drawings shall be subject to rejection. They shall also be subject to repair or replacement by the Vendor if such conditions are discovered after delivery at the Owner's facility. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 12 21.0 RELAY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS Note: A site specific required response spectra (RRS) will be attached when required. Reference Section 12.2.3. 21.1 219 Series 300 V General Purpose Plug-In Relay Specification Requirements 219 Series Relay Physical Dimensions and Contact Arrangement 21.2 B255 Series 300 V Latching Plug-In Relay Requirements B255 Series Relay Physical Dimensions and Contact Arrangement 21.3 219 & B255 Series Mating Socket Physical Dimensions Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 13 SECTION 21.1 219 Series 300 V General Purpose Plug-in Relay Specification Requirements Reference: Struthers-Dunn Commercial/Industrial Relays Catalog Type 219BBXP: Double-pole, double-throw plus 2 normally-open sets of contacts Type 219ABAP: Double-pole, double-throw plus 1 normally-open and 1 normally-closed set of contacts General Data: Insulation: 1/4" surface, 1/8" air Dielectric: 1500 VAC minimum Operate Time: 25 ms maximum Release Time: 20 ms maximum Coil Data: 120 VAC Relay, 50-60 Hz, 5 VA: Voltage: 102 - 132 VAC Current: 75 mA open, 40 mA closed (typical) Impedance: 2700 ohms (typical) Resistance; 540 ohms +/- 10% 24/28 VDC Relays, 2.3 W at 25 degrees C: Voltage: 19.2 - 30.8 VDC Current: 77 mA hot, 915 mA cold (typical) Resistance: 250 ohms +/- 10% 115/125 VDC Relays, 2.5 W at 25 degrees C: Voltage: 90 - 140 VDC Current: 16 mA hot, 20 mA cold (typical) Resistance: 6200 ohms +/- 10% Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 14 SECTION 21.1 219 Series 300 V General Purpose Plug-in Relay Specification Requirements Contact Data: Composition: Gold diffused silver cadmium oxide contacts unless specified otherwise 120 VAC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 10 A resistive break, 3 A inductive break 24/28 VDC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 10 A resistive break, 3 A Inductive break 115/126 VDC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 0.5 A resistive break, 0.1 A inductive break Optional Features: - Indicator Lamp - Coil suppression Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 16 SECTION 21.1 Figure "219 Series Relay Physical Dimensions and Contact Arrangement" omitted. Specification No. 6-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 16 SECTION 21.2 B255 Series 300 V Latching Plug-In Relay Requirements Reference: Struthers-Dunn Commercial/Industrial Relays Catalog Type B255XCXP: Three-pole, double-throw General Data: Insulation: 1/4" surface, 1/8" air Dielectric: 1500 VAC minimum Operate Time: 25 ms maximum, mechanically latches until reset coil is energized, even if power is interrupted Release Time: 20 ms maximum, when reset coil is energized Coil Data: 120 VAC Relay, 50-60 Hz, 5 VA; Voltage: 102 - 132 VAC Reset Coil (3 VA): Current @ 60 Hz: 22.6 mA (typical) Resistance: 1700 +/- 10% ohms Operate Coil (5 VA): Current @ 60 Hz: 75 mA open, 40 mA closed (typical) Resistance: 540 +/- 10% ohms 24/28 VDC Relays, 2.3 W at 25 degrees C: Voltage: 19.2 - 30.8 VDC Reset Coil (1, 7 W): Current: 70 mA (typical) Resistance: 340 +/- 10% ohms Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 17 SECTION 21.2 B255 Series 300 V Latching Plug-In Relay Requirements Operate Coil (2.3 W): Current: 96 mA (typical) Resistance: 250 + /- 10% ohms 115/125 VDC Relays, 2.5 W at 25 degrees C: Voltage: 90 - 140 VDC Reset Coil (, 7 W): Current: 13.8 mA (typical) Resistance: 9000 +/- 10% ohms Operate Coil (2.5 W): Current: 20 mA cold, 16 mA hot (typical) Resistance: 6200 +/- 10% ohms Contact Data: Composition: Gold diffused silver cadmium oxide contacts unless specified otherwise 120 VAC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 10 A resistive break, 3 A inductive break 24/28 VDC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 10 A resistive break, 3 A inductive break 115/125 VDC: 30 A make, 10 A carry, 0.5 A resistive break, 0.1 A inductive break Optional Features: - Indicator Lamp - Coil suppression Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-0343 Revision 0 Page 18 SECTION 21.2 Figure "B255 Series Relay Physical Dimensions and Contact Arrangement: omitted. Specification No. S-C-RCP-EDS-034-3 Revision 0 Page 19 SECTION 21.3 Figure "219 & B255 Series Mating Socket Physical Dimensions" omitted. *** END OF DOCUMENT ***

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