United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Protecting People and the Environment

State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses Project Volume 1: Peach Bottom Integrated Analysis (NUREG/CR-7110, Volume 1, Revision 1)

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Publication Information

Manuscript Completed: May 2013
Date Published: May 2013

Prepared by:
Nathan Bixler, Randall Gauntt, Joseph Jones,
Mark Leonard (dycoda LLC)

Sandia National Laboratories
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185
Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

NRC Job Code N6306

Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Washington, DC 20555-0001

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Abstract

The evaluation of accident phenomena and the offsite consequences of severe reactor accidents has been the subject of considerable research by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) over the last several decades. As a consequence of this research focus, analyses of severe accidents at nuclear power reactors are more detailed, integrated, and realistic than at any time in the past. A desire to leverage this capability to address conservative aspects of previous reactor accident analysis efforts was a major motivating factor in the genesis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analysis (SOARCA) project. By applying modern analysis tools and techniques, the SOARCA project developed a body of knowledge regarding the realistic outcomes of severe reactor accidents. To accomplish this objective, the SOARCA project used integrated modeling of accident progression and offsite consequences using both state-of-the-art computational analysis tools and best modeling practices drawn from the collective wisdom of the severe accident analysis community. This study focused on providing a realistic evaluation of accident progression, source term, and offsite consequences for the Peach Bottom Nuclear Power Station. By using the most current emergency preparedness practices, plant capabilities, and best available modeling, these analyses are more detailed, integrated, and realistic than past analyses. These analyses also consider all mitigative measures, contributing to a more realistic evaluation.

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